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Posts tagged “Pyrotechnics

Tubac Fireworks in Spanish Colonial Times

 In this photograph a boy is shown cutting carrizo  into open ended tubes for cohete powder cases.


In this photograph a boy is shown cutting carrizo into open ended tubes for cohete powder cases.

For centuries, sky rockets, fire-crackers and noise makers have enlivened both religious and secular life in the small towns of colonial New Spain. Tubac was no exception. Particularly in smaller, outlying towns and pueblos, people were extremely fond of noisy, evil-smelling rockets, squibs and firearms. When fireworks were not available, the soldiers fired their muskets at their own expense, or loaded the small cannon and boomed away to everyone’s delight.

 

Lighting the fuse in this photo

Lighting the fuse in this photo

Fiestas, royal birthdays, military victories, the arrival of a new viceroy in Mexico City, all of these and more were occasions to celebrate by burning gun powder.  Even during phases of the mass, men standing on the roof or outside along the walls of the church, exploded cohetas (sky rockets), triquitraques (firecrackers), and morteretes or camaras (small mortars).  The sky filled with small fleecy puffs of smoke and the air became alive with scores of sharp explosions. How ancient this practice is, it is difficult to say. Perhaps Jesuit priests, returning from China in times long past, brought this custom with them. The Chinese used fireworks to frighten away evil spirits during festivals and religious ceremonies.

 

Photo of cane castillo framework and basic figures of the gigantes under an open shed in a small Mexican town, ready to be refurnished for the next fiesta.

Photo of cane castillo framework and basic figures of the gigantes under an open shed in a small Mexican town, ready to be refurnished for the next fiesta.

One of our stalwart volunteers found the makings of a mini-exhibit when she was working in the museum last week. Originally, the exhibit occupied a case with 17 firework rockets attached to the wall and laid out on the floor. An entry on the inventory says, “Deaccessioned & destroyed on 12/30/93 on orders of Park Manager & SafetyOfficer due to dangerous & unstable qualities/condition of the explosives.” We include these 1950s era photographs showing the artisanal nature of Mexican fireworks manufacture, and they are great. We will display them on the big table in air conditioned Otero Hall on July 4th.

 

Some interesting information is contained in these photos:

Castillos are large cane frames covered with a variety of pyrotechnics and brilliant flares. They can cost between 20,000 to 250,000 pesos depending on size and complexity. Other cane frameworks are called Gigantes, large figures that are most often made to honor patron saints or Mexico’s patriot heroes. The cane is variously called carrizo or arundo.

 

Another cane work frame with the papier-mache shape of a bull is called a torito, (little bull). Generally painted a bright red and trimmed with green or yellow, these can be carried. During festivals, a man or boy holds the shell over his head and shoulders by the legs of the frame, and runs through the streets. Covered with small rockets, fire crackers and “busca pies” (foot seekers) the fireworks dart like fiery snakes from the torito and scoot along the ground or pavement with whistling sounds.

In this photo, another cane work frame with the papier mache shape of a bull called a torito, (little bull).

In this photo, another cane work frame with the papier mache shape of a bull called a torito, (little bull).

 

When hung over the door or fastened to a wall, they denote a firework maker’s house.  The fireworks industry was (and remains) artisanal, with production concentrated in family-owned workshops and small factories.

 

The home manufacture of all sorts of fireworks provides many workers with a means of livelihood, dangerous though it may be.  As with many Mexican crafts, much of the work is done in private homes by men and boys, who, in the course of years, become quite skilled.  Paper being scarce in the hinterlands, many of the cases for the rockets and crackers are small tubes cut from the ever present arundo, carrizo, or cane, which is then wrapped with tough twine and covered with pitch.

 

Join us on July 4th when admission is free from 10am to noon and step into Otero Hall to check out this mini-exhibit, but don’t stay too long or you’ll miss the free hotdogs and nachos, the lemonade and watermelon, and the various games and activities for the youngsters. A fun, safe and happy holiday to all of our readers!

 

 

Tubac Presidio Park online gift shop

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